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Open Source Java Reporting with JasperReports and iReport : Page 5

JasperReports is a powerful and flexible open source reporting solution. The iReport visual designer enables you to take advantage of the full power of JasperReports without in-depth knowledge of the JasperReports native XML format.


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Using JasperReports from Java

So now you have a working JasperReports report. How do you use it from within your Java application?

The JasperDesign object, in the net.sf.jasperreports.engine package, is the Java representation of the XML report you designed using iReport. You load the XML report and compile it into a JasperReport object, which does the actual report generation:

JasperDesign jasperDesign = JasperManager.loadXmlDesign("MyReport.xml"); JasperReport jasperReport = JasperManager.compileReport(jasperDesign);



In a real application, you shouldn't do this every time you generate a report, as it is time consuming and easily cached.

Once you have a compiled report, you can feed it data and use it to generate reports.

When you generate the report, you can provide runtime parameters via a Map. This is useful for providing information that is unknown at design time, such as a user-customized report title. From within the JasperReport report, you declare the parameter in the "View/Report Parameters" window and then use the parameter variable just like the other fields and variables you saw previously:

// Run-time report parameters Map parameters = new HashMap(); parameters.put("title", "A user-customized title");

Of course, you also need to provide a valid JDBC connection to the target database:

// Fetch your database connection Connection conn = DBConnectionFactory.getConnection();

Finally, you use the JasperFillManager class to combine the compiled report model with the incoming data to generate a print-ready report:

JasperPrint jasperPrint = JasperFillManager.fillReport(jasperReport, parameters, conn);

Now use the JasperPrintManager to generate the report in whatever format you want. JasperReport supports a lot of formats: PDF, Excel, XML, HTML, CVS, etc. But for now, just write the report to a PDF file:

JasperExportManager.exportReportToPdfFile(jasperPrint, "report.pdf");

There are lots of other possibilities. Check out the JasperReports APIs for more details.

Other Reporting Tools

A number of other reporting tools are available, so how does JasperReports/iReport stack up to the others? Here are a couple of the main actors in the field:
  • Eclipse BIRT is a new, up-and-coming charting and reporting tool with a nice Eclipse plugin. Although a relative newcomer, it has some powerful reporting and charting functionalities. On the other hand, it is less mature than JasperReports, and it seems less well integrated with Java It also relies on internal JavaScript scripting for report enhancing. Integration with datasources other than a plain JDBC connection seems to be complicated as well. Nevertheless, it is worth a look.
  • Business Objects/Crystal Reports is a powerful commercial BI/reporting solution with a slick graphical designer. A full-fledged Crystal Reports Server XI Edition license (20 users) costs around $7,500. The Crystal Reports IX Developer Edition, a lighter version more oriented towards Web application development, is available for around $595 per developer. Even in the latest version, Java integration seems to be limited however.

A Dynamic Duo

JasperReports is powerful and flexible reporting tool, which is easy to integrate into a Java environment. iReport takes a lot of the hard work out of designing reports with JasperReports—without comprising its power. Together, they form an impressive pair. Try it out!



John Ferguson Smart is principal consultant at Wakaleo Consulting, a company that provides consulting, training, and mentoring services in Enterprise Java and Agile Development. Well known in the Java community for his many published articles and talks, he is also the author of the book Java Power Tools.
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