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More articles by Jimmy Nilsson

Author Bio
Jimmy Nilsson is a developer with more than 14 years of experience and also the author of ".NET Enterprise Design with Visual Basic .NET and SQL Server 2000." Reach Jimmy at www.jnsk.se and Jimmy.Nilsson@jnsk.se.
For VB-2-the-Max | July 14, 2003
This is the fifth part in a series of articles by Jimmy Nilsson on a new architecture for enterprise applications in .NET. The new architecture is purely object-oriented with maintainability as the number one goal, while still focusing on roundtrips and the data access code to get good performance. In this article, Jimmy will discuss the new architecture from a persistence access layer perspective.
For VB-2-the-Max | May 19, 2003
This is the fourth in a series of articles by Jimmy Nilsson on a new architecture for enterprise applications in .NET. The new architecture is purely object-oriented, while still focusing on roundtrips and the data access code to get good performance.
For VB-2-the-Max | April 28, 2003
This is the third in a series of articles by Jimmy Nilsson on a new architecture for enterprise applications in .NET. The new architecture is purely object-oriented, while still focusing on roundtrips and the data access code to get good performance. In this article, Jimmy will discuss the new architecture from the consumer perspective and show how it can be used for solving a simple, yet typical, use case.
For VB-2-the-Max | September 21, 2002
This is the first in a new series of articles by Jimmy Nilsson on a new architecture for enterprise applications in .NET. The new architecture is more purely object-oriented, while still focusing on roundtrips and the data access code to get good performance.
For Com Or Dcom Or Com+ | August 3, 2002
Even though you may want to use some COM+ services, it doesn't mean that you have to have a unique context for each and every instance. The root instance, that is, the instance that the client uses, must have a context, but the secondary instances can often co-locate within the first context. ...
For Com Or Dcom Or Com+ | August 3, 2002
If you use Shared members in .NET or modules in VB6, you reduce COM+ context overhead without any risk whatsoever that you will get extra context overhead for that code. You also release yourself from the clean-up burden that you have in both worlds. Instead of the VB6 consumer code:
For Com Or Dcom Or Com+ | August 3, 2002
In another item in this Tip Bank (see link below), we mention that you can co-locate secondary instances within the context of the caller. If you don't need any services at all for your secondary components, then you don't have to configure them as COM+ components either. You lose the ...
For Com Or Dcom Or Com+ | August 3, 2002
Instances of configured components, that is, components configured in COM+, get runtime services owing to context objects. When you instantiate a COM+ component, your instance will live in a context object. When you call a method of your instance, the call will go through the context and that ...
For VB-2-the-Max | November 24, 2001
In this article you will be presented with a number of tips taken from lessons that the author has learned after a couple of years working with COM+, VB6 and SQL Server.
For VB-2-the-Max | April 28, 2001
In this article, Jimmy Nilsson makes a few guesses of how you can change your coding style and prepare yourself for the transition to make it as smooth as possible. He will focus on components, especially for the server-side.
For VB-2-the-Max | March 17, 2001
Are there times when server-side caching is a good idea? How does server-side caching impact data access performance? Testing the various techniques seems to be the only way this can be determined. Thats what this article is all about. It examines and shows test results for COM+ techniques that are VB-friendly such as using the Shared Properties Manager, using the file system, and using global variables, a lookup table, the Global Interface Table, and commerce.dictionary, and compares these techniques to the caching performance of going to the database each time for data and the baseline when no data is read. Then the article looks at other algorithms and caching options you might want to consider. Also provided with the article is a tool you can use for your own tests.
For VB-2-the-Max | January 13, 2001
A trace tool for tracing the execution path is a very powerful tool for debugging applications. When it comes to n-tier applications that use ASP, configured COM+ components and stored procedures in SQL Server it's a "must-have" tool. In this first part of a three-part article, Jimmy Nilsson starts by discussing some tracing aspects for SQL Server.
For VB-2-the-Max | October 28, 2000
In this article Jimmy proposes a way of taking care of assertions instead of using the Debug.Assert found in VB. The technique Jimmy shows will work even after deployment. The assertions will be shown with COM+ specific constructs and there will be some thoughts about how to take the assertions to the next level.
For VB-2-the-Max | September 9, 2000
In this article Jimmy Nilsson shows you his ordinary code structure for COM+ components, that you can use as a template for your own apps. The article is filled with tips and advice about where to get a reference to the ObjectContext, how to build a robust error handler, how to work with interfaces, and more.
For VB-2-the-Max | September 2, 2000
When you use JIT activation there is a special situation that you have to be prepared for, and you must learn how to deal correctly with error 462. This article discusses this issue, and mentions other not-so-obvious problems with trapping errors with a With clause. It also shows out to force an access violation error and suggests checking how your components behave in that circumstance.
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