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More articles by Michael Voss

Author Bio
Michael Voss is a Senior Staff Software Engineer at Intel Corp. Voss received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University in 2001. He is currently a Senior Staff Software Engineer in the Performance Analysis and Threading Lab at Intel and an adjunct Professor in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto. His interests include parallel programming and optimizing compilers.
For Devx Special Reports | February 24, 2009
Despite claims by competing technologies, locks remain the best choice for implementing synchronization and protecting critical sections of your code.
For Devx Special Reports | February 24, 2009
When adding parallelism, the key design choice is to express concurrency in an application without explicitly managing the scheduling of that concurrency onto the hardware.
For Ruby Special Report | May 1, 2007
C++ developers learn Ruby at their own peril. Once they become familiar with this powerfully concise language, they may find returning to C++ a bitter pill to swallow.
For C++ Zone | December 11, 2006
If you're among the many developers who are tackling the multicore future by writing multithreaded applications today, you'll soon learn that the container classes provided by the C++ STL are not thread friendly. Intel provides a C++ template library with thread-safe concurrent containers. Get a walk-through of what you can expect.
For C++ Zone | October 26, 2006
Multithreaded applications are notoriously difficult to write, test, and debug, but for many client-server developers, this task will soon become necessary for some high-performance applications. If it's in your future, start here to get an introduction to the algorithms behind the scenes in Intel's C++ template library for multithreading and start demystifing the multicore future.
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