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SQL Server 2000 Replication 101: Terminology, Types, and Configuration : Page 4

It's wise to make sure you have a clear understanding of replication terminology, types of replication, and exactly what is occurring when you install and configure replication.


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Configuring Replication
Setting up SQL Server replication is easy because Enterprise Manager gives you a number of wizards to use. However, just the act of initially configuring replication requires that you make some decisions.

Preliminary Steps
Your servers must meet several requirements before you can configure replication. You should ensure that all the SQL Servers involved are using service accounts for both the SQL Server and SQL Agent logins, and that the servers can connect to each other sufficiently so that the type of replication you install will work.

You should use either SQL Server Enterprise or Standard Edition for the publishing and distribution servers. (For development, you can use the Developer Edition. There does not appear to be any difference between all three of these editions for replication purposes.)

Table 1 shows a consolidated version of the SQL Server Books Online matrix that shows you which edition of SQL Server you can use for the various types of replication.

Table 1: The types of replication and the SQL Server editions that will work with them.

Type of replication

Enterprise, Standard, Developer, and Evaluation



Personal and MSDE

CE

Snapshot

Yes

Yes

No

Transactional

Immediate Updating

Queued Updating

Yes

Yes

Yes

Subscriber only

Subscriber only

Subscriber only

No

No

No

Merge

Yes

Yes

Anonymous only


You can also replicate to heterogonous subscribers (non-SQL Server databases) for snapshot and transactional replication without updating subscribers. You can use SQL Server 2000 to subscribe to data being published from other databases such as Oracle, DB2, Microsoft Access, and other databases that satisfy certain ODBC or OLE DB subscriber requirements, but you must set it up programmatically. (For more information, see "Programming Replication from Heterogeneous Data Sources" in SQL Server Books Online.) When you choose to use non-SQL Server publishers, you can only use transactional and snapshot replication.

The Configure Publishing and Distribution Wizard
To get started configuring replication, you run the Configure Publishing, Subscribers, and Distribution wizard from Enterprise Manager. Despite its name, this wizard asks you to initially choose a location for the distribution server, and then asks you to enable one server as a publisher and one or more servers as subscribers. So before you start, you need to decide whether you are going to separate the distribution server from the publishing server.

For merge replication, you would normally place the distribution server on the publishing server because the activities of the distribution server are fairly light. But for snapshot and transactional replication, if the publisher production server is under significant load, it's a better practice to identify a separate server as a distribution server.

You can find the Configure Publishing, Subscribers, and Distribution option under Replication in the Enterprise Manager menu. Make sure you've registered each server you want involved in replication, and then select the server that you want to have as the distribution server.

The wizard initially asks whether you want to make the selected server its own distributor, as you see illustrated in Figure 1. If this is the first time you're running the dialog, choose this option, which is the default.



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