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CDS Brings Entity-to-entity Computing to Life

Digimax Multimedia's collaborative decentralized services (CDS) is a development framework that is both a consumer and a provider of data or functions, integrated with a dynamically configurable logic or processing layer. CDS enables entity-to-entity computing, a concept that Digimax believes will emerge and enable the next generation of Internet-based business technology.


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istribution and decentralization—with XML as their foundation—are at the core of Digimax Multimedia's collaborative decentralized services (CDS) technology. CDS is a development framework that is both a consumer and a provider of data or functions, integrated with a dynamically configurable logic or processing layer.

CDS can consume XML data from any source through various transports, including HTTP, FTP, SMTP, POP3, or an instant messaging format. The XML consumed can contain presentation templates, raw data, connection profiles/preferences, and security information, as well as application logic. CDS then sorts through this data, using its XSL-like tag schema to describe where to get the information, what to do when it has all the data, and what to do with the result when it is done processing. CDS documents act as scripts that describe the logic of the application (see Figure 1).

Click to enlarge
Figure 1: Digimax's CDS Process



This functionality, called entity-to-entity computing, is a concept that Digimax believes will emerge and enable the next generation of Internet-based business technology. With this concept, an entity can be a single user, a company, or a group of companies; a computer or a fleet of computers all over the world; or a variety of combinations of users, functions, computers, companies, or devices. The only requirement is that the data exchanged among them must be in XML form. However, data in another format can be transformed into XML with a connector that abstracts the conversion from the CDS core. For instance, a connector to convert to and from EDI could be used to process data that is accessible through one of the transports.

CDS's ability to be both a data provider and a data consumer in conjunction with conditional logic enables it to be both a client and a server. A few additional factors contribute to its future value:

  • CDS does not need to be on both sides of the entity-to-entity connection to function.
  • Since CDS documents are text that contains the application, logic, or functionality, a CDS-based application can receive new instructions over the Internet without requiring user or administrator intervention (except possibly for security).
  • The possible configurations and locations of the data are at the discretion of the application designer.
  • A high degree of separation exists between the developers who specialize in each tier of development. For example, an HTML developer need never know anything about how CDS functions or is coded. The same is true for third-tier developers. Data designers need to have an understanding of XML and how it relates to the data management systems on which they develop.

Editor's Note: The author, Joshua Lynn, is a member of Digimax Multimedia's executive team. We have selected this article for publication because we believe it to have objective technical merit.



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