Login | Register   
LinkedIn
Google+
Twitter
RSS Feed
Download our iPhone app
TODAY'S HEADLINES  |   ARTICLE ARCHIVE  |   FORUMS  |   TIP BANK
Browse DevX
Sign up for e-mail newsletters from DevX


advertisement
 

Copyrighting : Page 6

In this section, you'll learn how to keep out of trouble when working with material on the Web.


advertisement
Copyright Reference
This section provides a quick reference guide to the length of Copyright, as well as links to sites with more information on Copyright law.

Length of Copyright
On October 27, 1998, the Sonny Bono Copyright Extension Act was enacted into Copyright Law. This Act extends the duration of copyright by adding 20 years to each of the previous copyright durations. In addition, any copyright still in its renewal term as of October 27, 1998 will have a copyright of 95 years from the date the copyright was secured.

The following table lists the new, updated length of copyright:



Year Copyright Law
Before 1978—Published Work is protected for 75 years from date of publication, providing copyright was renewed.
Pre 1978 (created but not published) The Copyright begins on January 1, 1978 and generally lasts for the life of last surviving author, plus 70 years.
1978 to Present—Copyright owned by an individual The Copyright lasts for 70 years after the death of the author
1978 to Present-Copyright owned by an employer of author Copyright lasts for 95 years from the day of publication or 120 years from date of creation—whichever comes first.

Links to Sites with Copyright Information

  • The United States Copyright Office, at the library of congress, provides detailed information about Copyright law. You'll find a new link to the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DCMA) of 1998 here.

  • Thomas legislative information on the internet; a site that provides full text of United States legislation. You can search by concept, or by specific Bills. S. 2037 is the newest internet Copyright bill.

  • The Berne Copyright Convention , located at Cornell University's United States Code Web site.

  • Title 17, the Copyright Act, located at Cornell University's United States Code Web site.

  • The Digital Future Coalition Web site provides current information on copyright law.

  • Intellectual Property Law Web site.





Comment and Contribute

 

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

 

Sitemap
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date