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Home » Tip Bank » C++
Language: C++
Expertise: All
Jun 30, 1999

Using Integral Types With Explicit Sizes

The actual size of the built-in integral types are machine dependent (see also the Tip Standards Provide Guarantees Regarding the Sizes of Integral Types):

 
//built-in integral types with machine-dependent sizes
char 
int 
short 
long 

When you need explicit, platform-independent sizes, you can use the following standardized typedef's instead:

 
int8  //signed 8 bits
int16 
int32 

These typedef's are defined in the standard header <stddef.h> for C and <cstddef.h> for C++. Many platforms also define int64. Unsigned versions of these typedef's exist as well:

 
uint8  //unsigned 8 bits
uint16 
uint32 
Danny Kalev
 
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