Login | Register   
Twitter
RSS Feed
Download our iPhone app
TODAY'S HEADLINES  |   ARTICLE ARCHIVE  |   FORUMS  |   TIP BANK
Browse DevX
Sign up for e-mail newsletters from DevX


Tip of the Day
Language: C
Expertise: Beginner
Mar 9, 2004

The #define Directive

When you compile a program the compiler first uses a preprocessor to analyze the code. The #define directive can be used to either define a constant number or function or to replace an instruction in your code.

For instance:


#define for_ever_do while(1)
This means you can use for_ever_do instead of while(1) and the effect will be the same because the preprocessor first replaces for_ever_do with while(1) and then the program is compiled. With #define you can also create function or more precisely called, a macro.

Here's another example:


#define sqr(x) (x*x)
When you call sqr(6), the preprocessor will first replace sqr(6) with (6*6) and then compile the program.

Another thing that you can do with #define is concatanate two variables. For example:


#define conc(a,b)
int main() {
int xyz=123,try=125;
cout<<conc(xy,z)<<" "<<conc(t,ry);
}
This will display 123 125 because the preprocessor replaces conc(xy,z) with xyz and then evaluates it.
Raducanu Bogdan
 
Comment and Contribute

 

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

 

Sitemap