Login | Register   
LinkedIn
Google+
Twitter
RSS Feed
Download our iPhone app
TODAY'S HEADLINES  |   ARTICLE ARCHIVE  |   FORUMS  |   TIP BANK
Browse DevX
Sign up for e-mail newsletters from DevX


advertisement
 

Four Ways to Use Excel as an Internet Reporting Tool : Page 4

You probably already own one of the most powerful charting tools ever created. Learn to leverage the extensive charting capabilities of Excel to fulfill your Internet reporting needs.


advertisement
4. Excel Web Publishing Without Interactivity
This is the perfect way to go if you are working with static data with which your users have no need to interact.

Pros:

  • Requires no coding.

This is an excellent way to produce non-interactive charts based on static data.

Cons:

  • This solution lacks functionality and interactivity.
Again, Excel's online help for this is quite extensive, so I won't duplicate efforts in this article. The Excel help topic is "Putting Microsoft Excel data on the Web", but essentially you will be following the instructions listed in section one of this article on how to create and publish a chart.

Which Solution Is Right for You?
As you've seen, there are several solutions with varying levels of interactivity and capabilities. Table 1 consolidates this information and may help you decide which solution is right for you.

 

Users need IE 4+



Users need MS Office 2000+

Users need MS Office Web Components

Users can interact with data

Users view live data

1. Excel chart publishing

N

N

N

N

Y

2. Spreadsheet download

N

Y

N

Y

Y

3. Excels web publishing with interactivity

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

4. Excels web publishing without interactivity

N

N

N

N

N


Table 1: Which Solution Is Right for You?

Although there are many ways to do charting and reporting over the Internet, Excel can offer a powerful suite of tools for a fraction of the cost and effort involved with other applications.



Hugo Olliphant is a co-founder of gMoney Corp., an Internet service that helps individuals share common expenses. He periodically accepts consulting engagements for various Web development services. He is an ex-analyst from Putnam Hayes & Bartlett. Reach him by e-mail at devx-article@olliphant.com.
Comment and Contribute

 

 

 

 

 


(Maximum characters: 1200). You have 1200 characters left.

 

 

Sitemap