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Top 10 Google I/O Sessions for Android Developers

The Google I/O 2011 Developer conference is here. As an Android developer, what sessions should you attend? Here are 10 you can't miss.


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Google I/O is Google's annual developer conference. I/O 2011 promises to be another exciting event for Android developers. The conference size is fairly modest at 5,500, despite its Moscone Center location in downtown San Francisco. Perhaps due to the tremendously cool conference swag, including two Android phones, received by attendees of Google I/O 2010, the Google I/O 2011 conference sold out less than an hour after going public. There are dozens of sessions available over the two-day conference. Here we discuss the top 10 sessions most appropriate for Android developers.

If you didn't get a ticket to Google I/O, don't despair. You've got two other options this year to participate. Google will be running a program called I/O Extended at dozens of locations worldwide. I/O Extended is an opportunity to experience the conference with other developers and Google employees. Find out more about I/O Extended at its website. Also, for those who cannot make it to San Francisco or an I/O extended event, many I/O sessions will be streamed live via I/O Live. Besides keynotes, this will also include some Android sessions.

The Lowdown on Google I/O Sessions for Android Developers

The complete list of sessions has been posted on the I/O 2011 website, but is subject to change, of course, and usually does. Sessions are ranked by difficulty: 101 (introductions), 201 (intermediate topics), 301 (advanced or specialty topics), Fireside chats (Q&A sessions) and Tech Talks (various geeky topics).



This year, Android developers have two main session tracks to choose from: the general Android track and a dedicated Android Games track. We think the games track is something of a misnomer; this track includes Android topics like OpenGL ES, anti-piracy, in-app billing and using the NDK--topics appropriate for many different Android apps--not just games. Don't forget to peruse the other tracks as well, such as the Dev Tools, Google APIs and App Engine tracks, as there are a number of sessions on technologies frequently leveraged by Android developers.

So without further ado, here are the top 10 sessions we are most excited about at this year's conference, in no particular order.

Building Android Apps for Google TV (Android, 201)

When Google TV was announced at last year's I/O conference, lots of Android developers got excited. At I/O this year, we can expect to hear a lot more details and really sink our teeth into this new device. This session discusses how to create new Android apps for Google TV, how to port existing apps to the platform and why developers should consider doing so.

Accelerated Android Rendering (Android, 201)

Android has had great support for OpenGL from the beginning. This session will go beyond that with coverage of new hardware accelerated pieces, likely talking about new additions in Android 3.0, including RenderScript and 2D acceleration in existing APIs.

Designing and Implementing Android UIs for Phones and Tablets (Android, 201)

Android tablets are the latest craze in consumer devices. Learn how to design apps to target both phones and tablets. If you're looking for an introduction to the new Fragments API, you are likely to find it here.

Best Practices for Accessing Google APIs on Android (Android, 201)

Many apps integrate with popular Google APIs. If you've been working with Android for any length of time, you've probably come to appreciate when Google clearly defines the best practices for working with their technologies and services. Using their best practices helps avoid application failures when upgrades and updates occur.

Building Aggressively Compatible Android Games (Android Games, 201)

This session is not just about games. It's about the steps required to achieve one of the holy grails of Android development: a single, maintainable application package to support all Android devices.



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