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Checking Browser Locale

Checking Browser Locale

Similar to GzipServlet, this tip uses header information for tuningoutput of our servlets; this one allows you to check the header ‘Accept-Language’. If your user has set some language preferences within her own browser, you can read these settings through this header:

 import java.io.*;import javax.servlet.*;import javax.servlet.http.*;public class BrowserLocaleServlet extends HttpServlet {                              public void doGet 
(HttpServletRequest req,HttpServletResponse res) throws ServletException, IOException { doPost(req,res); } public void doPost (HttpServletRequest req,
HttpServletResponse res) throws ServletException, IOException { String userLocale=req.getHeader("Accept-Language"); PrintWriter out=res.getWriter(); res.setContentType("text/html"); out.println(""); out.println("
User settings are: "+userLocale); out.println(""); out.flush(); out.close(); } }

For example, in my case, the output is ‘User settings are: en’. Depending on that settings, you can format, for example, your date before output. You should note that you have to see the HTTP manual for a full description of coding issues in this string.

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