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Put buffering and Response.Flush to good use

Put buffering and Response.Flush to good use

IIS5 enables buffering by default, therefore all the output from your ASP is actually sent to the browser only when the page completes its processing. In many cases this approach improves the overall processing speed, and indirectly makes for a more scalable site. However, buffering has two minor defects: (1) the end user might perceive a loss in speed, because she won’t see any output until the page is complete, and (2) buffered output has to be maintained on the server, therefore your ASP application is going to take more memory than it would do if buffering were disabled. On server machines with an inadequate amount of memory, large HTML pages can reduce the overall performance.

Fortunately, you can solve both problems with judicious use of the Response.Flush method, that lets you flush the output buffer periodically when sending a large amount of data back to the client. For example, if you are sending back to the client data from thousands of records, you might flush the buffer every 100 records, so that the end user sees some results earlier and you don’t tax the server’s memory.

Note, however, that you must take special precautions when your output is an HTML table, because many browsers won’t render the table until the closing is received. For more info, see the link below.

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