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Tip of the Day
Language: Java
Expertise: Intermediate
Apr 28, 2000

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Use Finally For Guaranteed Code Execution

Java's exception handling mechanism provides developers with an elegant, easy-to-use way to handle exceptional situations in their programs. For example, if there is a file operation to be performed, one might write code like:
 
String fileToRead = "someFileToRead"; 
String fileToWrite = "someFileToWrite"; 
try 
{ 
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(fileToRead); 
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(fileToWrite); 
    byte[] readBuffer = new byte[2152]; 
    int bytesIn = 0; 
    while((bytesIn = fis.read(readBuffer)) != -1) 
    { 
        fos.write(readBuffer, 0, bytesIn);            
    } 
    //close the streams 
    fos.close(); 
    fis.close(); 
} 
catch (Exception e) 
{ 
    //handle exception 
} 
Now, if any exception happens before we get to close the streams, the execution of the program will go to our exception handler, and we will leave the streams open. This is a very potential source of memory leaks. Java's finally clause provides us with a mechanism to prevent such situations from happening.

The code inside a finally block will be executed through both normal execution of the program as well as situations where exceptions take place. Thus, finally blocks guarantee code execution. Let's re-arrange our code above to take advantage of a finally block when your code runs normally but also when an exception occurs in the try block.
 
String fileToRead = "someFileToRead"; 
String fileToWrite = "someFileToWrite"; 
FileInputStream fis = null; 
FileOutputStream fos = null; 
try 
{ 
    fis = new FileInputStream(fileToRead); 
    fos = new FileOutputStream(fileToWrite); 
    byte[] readBuffer = new byte[2152]; 
    int bytesIn = 0; 
    while((bytesIn = fis.read(readBuffer)) != -1) 
    { 
        fos.write(readBuffer, 0, bytesIn);            
    } 
} 
catch (Exception e) 
{ 
    //handle exception 
} 
finally 
{ 
   //close the streams 
   //the close operation may throw exceptions 
   try 
   { 
        fos.close(); 
    } 
    catch(Exception e) 
    { 
    } 
    finally 
    { 
        try 
        { 
             fis.close 
        } 
        catch(Exception e) 
        { 
        } 
    } 
} 
This way, we make sure that we close our streams regardless stream operations being successful or exceptional.
Behrouz Fallahi
 
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