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CPS Financial Report Reveals Lost Tech

CPS Financial Report Reveals Lost Tech

Lost Tech

The Chicago Public Schools (CPS) Inspector General has unveiled its 2023 financial year report, indicating that more than $23 million in technology equipment was reported as lost or stolen during the 2021-22 academic year, with insufficient search and recovery measures.

Following the district’s inaugural inventory assessment after the COVID-19 pandemic, the report deems these figures “alarmingly high” and disapproves of the current supervisory practices. The report further suggests that an upgrade in asset management and improved tracking methods should be implemented to prevent such losses in the future. It also highlights the urgent need for increased accountability and transparency within the district to better protect investments made in education technology and resources.

Inventory of lost and stolen items

The list of unaccounted-for items includes laptops, iPads, Wi-Fi hotspots, printers, document cameras, and interactive whiteboards. The report highlighted that at 36 schools, 100 percent of technology devices were registered as lost or stolen. Concurrently, CPS allocated roughly $124 million to technology, marking the highest expenditure in the previous five academic years. This alarming loss of technology devices raises concerns about the effectiveness of the inventory management system and the potential misuse of funds in the CPS system. Additionally, the sheer volume of missing items puts a significant strain on district budgets and may jeopardize students’ and teachers’ access to essential resources and digital tools for performance enhancement and remote learning.

CPS response to the problem

Recognizing the problem, CPS stated, “In a District of our size, some device loss is expected, but we remain concerned about the loss of any public asset.” The district is working to revamp the existing procedures, improve systems, and ensure school leaders adhere to asset management policies. Additionally, CPS is investing in advanced tracking technologies and increasing staff training to mitigate device losses in the future. They are committed to enhancing accountability and safeguarding resources to maximize their positive impact on the education of their students.

Device depreciation and optimization

CPS explained that most of the devices mentioned in the report were over five years old and that their current worth is likely around $2.5 million due to depreciation. Moreover, they emphasized the importance of regular updates and maintenance in order to extend the lifespans of these devices and protect them from potential security risks. CPS also mentioned that they are constantly looking for ways to optimize their budget and equipment in order to better serve students across the district.

Retrieval efforts for the missing devices

As of Monday, over 12,000 of the 77,000 devices cited have been retrieved. The massive retrieval effort has been primarily focused on locating and securing these devices to prevent further damage and potential security breaches. Authorities and experts are working tirelessly to ensure the remaining devices are collected as quickly as possible, emphasizing the urgency of this operation to the public.

Inspector General’s perspective and commitment

CPS Inspector General Will Fletcher declared, “It’s just wasteful, that’s what our office is here to address, and that’s what we do.”Fletcher further stated that eradicating waste and ensuring optimal use of resources are the primary goals of the inspector general’s office. His team remains committed to identifying and addressing inefficiencies within CPS, promoting improved performance and accountability throughout the system.

First Reported on: foxnews.com

FAQ

What was the main finding of the CPS financial year report?

The main finding of the CPS financial year report indicated that more than $23 million in technology equipment was reported as lost or stolen during the 2021-22 academic year, with insufficient search and recovery measures.

What items were included in the inventory of lost and stolen items?

The inventory of lost and stolen items included laptops, iPads, Wi-Fi hotspots, printers, document cameras, and interactive whiteboards.

Why do these losses raise concerns?

These losses raise concerns about the effectiveness of the inventory management system and the potential misuse of funds in the CPS system. The missing items also put a significant strain on district budgets and may jeopardize students’ and teachers’ access to essential resources and digital tools for performance enhancement and remote learning.

What steps is CPS taking in response to these losses?

CPS is working to revamp existing procedures, improve systems, and ensure school leaders adhere to asset management policies. They are also investing in advanced tracking technologies and increasing staff training to mitigate device losses in the future, as well as enhancing accountability and safeguarding resources.

What is the current worth of the lost devices?

Due to depreciation, the current worth of the lost devices is estimated to be around $2.5 million, as most of the devices were over five years old.

What is the progress of the retrieval efforts for the missing devices?

As of Monday, over 12,000 of the 77,000 devices cited have been retrieved, with authorities and experts working tirelessly to locate and secure the remaining devices to prevent further damage and potential security breaches.

What is the Inspector General’s perspective on the issue?

CPS Inspector General Will Fletcher believes that the situation is wasteful and that his office’s primary goals are to eradicate waste and ensure optimal use of resources within the CPS system. His team remains committed to identifying and addressing inefficiencies, promoting improved performance and accountability throughout the system.

Noah Nguyen

Noah Nguyen is a multi-talented developer who brings a unique perspective to his craft. Initially a creative writing professor, he turned to Dev work for the ability to work remotely. He now lives in Seattle, spending time hiking and drinking craft beer with his fiancee.
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