devxlogo

Remove Unneeded #Includes Directive From the Release Version

Remove Unneeded #Includes Directive From the Release Version

It’s customary to use output statements as a debugging aid. For example, displaying the name of a function that is currently in scope or printing a variable’s value on the screen. These statements are automatically removed from the release version of the application by macro magic. For example:

   void func()  {    int n;    n = sqrt(n);  #ifdef DEBUG // code below exists only in debug version    cout <<"value of n: "<< n << endl;  #endif  }

Seemingly, the statements enclosed in #ifdef macros don't incur any overhead in the release version because the preprocessor removes them when the symbol DEBUG isn't defined. However, programmers often forget to enclose the #include directive within an #ifdef clause. The objects add a substantial amount of code to the program, increasing the executable's size and memory footprint by up to 200 KB under certain conditions. Therefore, remember to remove the #include directive if your app doesn't use any of the iostream objects. Alternatively, you can wrap the #include directive in an #ifdef clause:

   #ifdef DEBUG // only in debug mode  #include  // not included in release version  #endif  int main()  {    func();  }
See also  5 Tips for Choosing the Right Medical Software for Your Practice
devxblackblue

About Our Editorial Process

At DevX, we’re dedicated to tech entrepreneurship. Our team closely follows industry shifts, new products, AI breakthroughs, technology trends, and funding announcements. Articles undergo thorough editing to ensure accuracy and clarity, reflecting DevX’s style and supporting entrepreneurs in the tech sphere.

See our full editorial policy.

About Our Journalist