devxlogo

Understanding Stack Overflow

Understanding Stack Overflow

The stack is a region of memory on which local automatic variables are created and function arguments are passed. The implementation allocates a default stack size per process. On modern operating systems, a typical stack has at least 1 megabyte, which is sufficient for most purposes. Under anomalous conditions, the program exceeds its stack limit. This causes a stack overflow. The two most common causes for a stack overflow is an infinite recursion, as in:

 int f(){ g();}int g() { f();  }

f() calls g(), which in turn calls f() and so on. Eventually, the stack overflows. Another common cause for stack overflow is an attempt to create a large array on the stack, for example:

 int main(){ int n[10000000]; // array is too large  int j =0; //j's address exceeds the stack's limits, error}

If your program crashes due to a stack overflow, check for infinite recursion or too large local objects.

See also  Essential Measures for Safeguarding Your Digital Data
devxblackblue

About Our Editorial Process

At DevX, we’re dedicated to tech entrepreneurship. Our team closely follows industry shifts, new products, AI breakthroughs, technology trends, and funding announcements. Articles undergo thorough editing to ensure accuracy and clarity, reflecting DevX’s style and supporting entrepreneurs in the tech sphere.

See our full editorial policy.

About Our Journalist