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Inside the Climate Battle: Make Sunsets’ Technique

Inside the Climate Battle: Make Sunsets’ Technique

Sunsets' Technique

On February 12, 2023, Luke Iseman and Andrew Song from the solar geoengineering firm Make Sunsets showcased their technique for injecting sulfur dioxide (SO₂) into the stratosphere as a means to combat climate change. The duo released a balloon containing the gas, which interacts with water vapor to form aerosols that deflect sunlight away from the Earth. With the sale of “cooling credits,” Make Sunsets hopes to counterbalance the heating impact of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Through this innovative approach, Iseman and Song aim to reduce global temperatures and minimize the effects of climate change on ecosystems and human populations. The company emphasizes the importance of thorough research, collaboration with climate scientists, and responsible scaling to ensure their method does not generate unintended consequences, while making strides towards a cooler, more sustainable planet.

Exploring Solar Radiation Management

Although the idea of solar radiation management (SRM) has generated apprehension regarding potential adverse effects on weather patterns and agriculture, an increasing number of scientists maintain that it might be a necessary measure. Since it is improbable that global warming will remain under 1.5 degrees Celsius, SRM could be less harmful than allowing temperatures to keep rising.

In order to mitigate the impacts of climate change, SRM essentially involves reflecting sunlight back into space, thus reducing the amount of solar energy absorbed by Earth. Some proposed methods include increasing the reflectivity of clouds, dispersing reflective aerosol particles in the atmosphere, and using space-based technologies like sunshades or mirrors.

Recreating the Mount Pinatubo Effect

SRM replicates the natural cooling phenomenon seen during volcanic eruptions like Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991 when it released 20 million tons of SO₂ into the atmosphere. This sulfur dioxide (SO₂) subsequently formed sulfate aerosols that reflected sunlight back into space, thus lowering the Earth’s temperature for a short period. Similarly, SRM technology attempts to mimic this process by dispersing reflective particles into the atmosphere to reduce global warming and combat climate change.

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Potential Benefits and Challenges of SRM

Studies suggest that extensive SRM implementation could not only decelerate global warming but also lower temperatures. The results could be apparent within months and at a relatively inexpensive price. However, some experts argue that relying solely on SRM could lead to potential side effects, such as disruption of precipitation patterns and regional climate alterations. It is crucial to weigh the benefits against the risks while also continuing to focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting sustainable energy solutions.

Proceeding with Caution and Collaboration

Nonetheless, it is essential to proceed cautiously to avoid harming the ozone layer, disrupting global weather, or affecting critical resources such as monsoons necessary for agriculture. Moreover, implementing a collaborative and transparent research approach involving experts from diverse fields can help identify and mitigate potential risks associated with these interventions. Additionally, creating a robust regulatory framework and incorporating ongoing monitoring will ensure that any unforeseen consequences are addressed and managed in a timely manner.

Addressing Limitations of SRM

Furthermore, SRM does not tackle the problem of ocean acidification, which poses a threat to marine life. Additionally, this method does not address the increasing damage caused to delicate ecosystems due to excessive carbon dioxide levels. As a result, relying solely on SRM may lead to unintended consequences, stressing the importance of comprehensive climate change strategies that include reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

In summary, as the consequences of climate change continue to escalate, innovative approaches like Make Sunsets’ sulfur dioxide injections demonstrate the potential for solar radiation management in helping to mitigate these effects. However, it is essential to approach these strategies with caution and collaboration, and to consider them as part of a comprehensive plan that also includes reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting sustainable energy solutions. By doing so, we can work towards a cooler, more sustainable future for our planet and its inhabitants.

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FAQ

What is Make Sunsets’ technique for battling climate change?

Make Sunsets uses a solar geoengineering method that involves injecting sulfur dioxide (SO₂) into the stratosphere. This gas interacts with water vapor to form aerosols that deflect sunlight away from the Earth, counterbalancing the heating impact of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

What is solar radiation management (SRM)?

Solar radiation management is a method for mitigating the impacts of climate change by reflecting sunlight back into space, reducing the amount of solar energy absorbed by Earth. Some proposed SRM methods include increasing cloud reflectivity, dispersing reflective aerosol particles, and using space-based technologies like sunshades or mirrors.

What is the Mount Pinatubo Effect?

The Mount Pinatubo Effect refers to the natural cooling phenomenon observed during volcanic eruptions, such as the one that occurred at Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991. The eruption released millions of tons of SO₂ into the atmosphere, which then formed sulfate aerosols that reflected sunlight back into space, lowering Earth’s temperature temporarily.

What are the potential benefits and challenges of SRM?

SRM could help decelerate global warming and even lower temperatures within months and at a relatively low cost. However, it may also have potential side effects, such as disrupting precipitation patterns and altering regional climates. The challenge lies in weighing these benefits against the possible risks and continuing to focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting sustainable energy solutions.

How can we proceed with caution and collaboration in SRM interventions?

By involving experts from diverse fields in a collaborative and transparent research approach, we can identify and mitigate potential risks associated with SRM interventions. Creating a robust regulatory framework and incorporating ongoing monitoring will also help ensure that unforeseen consequences are addressed and managed effectively.

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What are the limitations of SRM?

SRM does not address ocean acidification or the increasing damage to ecosystems caused by high carbon dioxide levels. Relying solely on SRM may lead to unintended consequences, emphasizing the need for comprehensive climate change strategies that also focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

First Reported on: scientificamerican.com
Featured Image Credit: Photo by ThisIsEngineering; Pexels; Thank you!

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