devxlogo

America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010

Definition of America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 is a U.S. federal legislation that aims to invest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, research, and innovation. The Act reauthorizes and expands key programs from the original America COMPETES Act of 2007, in order to improve STEM education and boost economic competitiveness. Additionally, the Act focuses on enhancing energy efficiency, supporting various research agencies, and strengthening cybersecurity.

Phonetic

The phonetic pronunciation of “America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010” is:ʌˈmɛrɪkə kəmˈpi:ts ri:ˌɔ(:)rəʊθərˈʌɪzeɪʃən ækt a>v 2010

Key Takeaways

  1. The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 aims to invest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and research, to promote innovation and ensure the United States’ economic competitiveness.
  2. This act provides funding for key scientific agencies, such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, supporting research programs and infrastructure crucial to American innovation.
  3. It emphasizes bolstering STEM education by improving teacher training, creating new pathways for students to pursue STEM careers, and engaging underrepresented groups in these fields, to create a diverse and highly-skilled STEM workforce.

Importance of America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 is a crucial piece of legislation that significantly impacts the United States’ commitment to technological innovation, research, and development.

This Act aims to strengthen the nation’s competitiveness by investing in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, providing federal grants for research, and fostering innovation through institutions like the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE). By supporting scientific collaboration, bolstering economic growth, and addressing various workforce development needs, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 plays a vital role in ensuring the long-term global leadership and technological success of the United States.

Explanation

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 is a piece of legislation aimed at fostering innovation and sustaining the competitiveness of the United States in the global market. Serving as an extension of the original America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) Act of 2007, the primary purpose of this law is to enhance the nation’s capacities in research, development, and education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

By supporting the funding and development of STEM-focused programs, research institutions, and educational initiatives, the Act seeks to cultivate a workforce equipped to excel in the technology-driven industries of the 21st century. To achieve this purpose, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 supports several federal agencies and initiatives that promote STEM innovation and competitiveness.

The Act augments the budgets of crucial organizations such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). By bolstering the funding for these organizations, the Reauthorization Act enables a rich environment of cutting-edge research and pioneering discoveries across various disciplines. Furthermore, by fostering collaborations among industry, academia, and the federal government, the Act intends to rapidly translate scientific findings into practical applications—thus driving the growth of the nation’s economy and maintaining its global leadership in groundbreaking research and technological advancements.

Examples of America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 aimed to promote innovation, economic growth, and competitiveness by providing funding for investments in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Here are three real-world examples of the technology initiatives supported by this legislation:

ARPA-E (Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy): ARPA-E is a program established under the Act to support transformative energy projects that translate scientific discoveries into technological solutions. The agency’s objective is to develop advanced energy technologies that are capable of significantly improving the country’s economic prosperity and environmental wellbeing. One of ARPA-E’s projects is the OPEN program, which has funded innovative clean energy technologies such as forms of compact fusion, advanced batteries, and smart grid technology.

NSF Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Program: The I-Corps program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), aims to empower researchers to explore the commercial potential of their technological innovations. Participants in the program receive training, networking opportunities, funding, and mentorship support to help them develop scalable business models. Successful I-Corps projects have led to the creation of new companies and technologies to address various challenges, such as water purification, drug development, and personalized medicine.

Investments in Education: The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 provides funding to strengthen STEM education at various levels, from K-12 to undergraduate and graduate programs. For instance, the act supports the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, recognizing outstanding STEM teachers and encouraging a focus on high-quality STEM education. Additionally, the bill promotes industry collaborations in community colleges, teaming up education programs with local businesses to help create specialized curricula designed to prepare students to enter the competitive STEM workforce.These real-world examples showcase how the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 has fostered innovation, strengthened STEM education, and driven economic growth in various sectors.

America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 FAQ

1. What is the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010?

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 is a federal law enacted to enhance America’s economic competitiveness in the global market. The Act aims to promote innovation, support research and development, and improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.

2. What were the main goals of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010?

The main goals of the Act were to invest in innovation through research and development, strengthen STEM education, and support the development of a competitive and skilled workforce for the 21st century.

3. How does this Act impact STEM education?

The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 aims to improve STEM education by supporting training programs, grants for teachers, and developing innovative teaching techniques. The Act also establishes a Presidential Advisory Council on STEM and authorizes the National Science Foundation to implement policies and programs that promote STEM education.

4. Are there any specific agencies or programs targeted by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010?

The Act targets key agencies and programs related to research, innovation, and education, including the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. It also authorizes investments in high-risk, high-reward energy research and the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E).

5. What happened to the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act after 2010?

While the Act was initially authorized for three years, it was reauthorized and expanded in 2015 with the passage of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2015. This new legislation continued the focus on research, innovation, and STEM education, with additional provisions for cybersecurity, advanced manufacturing, and energy research and development.

Related Technology Terms

  • STEM Education
  • Research and Development
  • Energy Innovation Hubs
  • National Science Foundation
  • Small Business Innovation Research

Sources for More Information

Table of Contents